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Coping with ‘Meltdowns’ By Professor Tony Attwood, Clinical Psychologist

Those who have an ASD are prone to have a catastrophic reaction or meltdown when overly stressed, anxious or frustrated. The meltdown may be externalised, with an intense despair that manifests as an expression of anger, perhaps with destruction of property or aggression towards a person. The meltdown can also be internalised, with intense self-blame and hatred and even suicidal…

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When and How Should I Inform my Child of Their Diagnosis? by Dr Wesley Turner, Clinical Psychologist

A common question that crops up when working with children with Autism Spectrum is when and how their child should be informed of their diagnosis. Caution often needs to be had when informing children and adolescents that they are on the Autism Spectrum without first gauging their level of self-concept, anxiety and level of negative thinking. As many children on…

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Bullying by Amy Cleator, Provisional Psychologist

Children and young people with ASD typically report higher rates of victimization and bullying than their typically developing (TD) peers.  For many young people with ASD, difficulties in understanding others, interacting with peers, and reading social cues can lead to a misunderstanding of social interactions.  Youth with ASD also tend to experience higher levels of negative emotion (e.g., anger and…

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Gender Identity and Autism – Supporting Adolescents While They Find Themselves by Dr Wesley Turner, Clinical Psychologist

The development of self-identity and gender identity can be a confusing time for most adolescents. This can be especially true for adolescents on the Autism Spectrum, as they are typically slower to develop self-concept than their neurotypical peers. In helping AS clients explore their self-identity and gender, psychologists may wish to be guided by initial clinical guidelines that have been…

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School Leavers with Autism- a longitudinal study By Ms Radhika Tanksale, Clinical Psychologist

Leaving school is a big change in an adolescence’s life. There are many avenues and options that need to be explored and considered. Given the associated executive dysfunction for some of the individuals on the autism spectrum, preparing, planning, organising, goal setting, decision-making, and self-initiation, this period in life can be challenging. Exploring and understanding the difference between young adults…

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ADHD and ASD – A review of co-morbid diagnoses in children by Ms. Toneya Ashby, Psychologist

Individuals on the Autism Spectrum often present with additional diagnoses, which are referred to as co-morbidities. One of the most common co-morbid diagnoses for an individual with ASD is Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Research suggests that between 37-85% of individuals with ASD will also present with features of ADHD (Leitner, 2014). As a result of this statistic, ADHD is commonly screened…

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Transitioning to the Workforce, Three key elements to success for students on the autism spectrum by Mr Jay Hobbs, Psychologist

The goal for any student moving from secondary school to employment is to establish a career path that utilises their strengths and interests. Finding a fulfilling career often ensures a sense of purpose, independence, confidence and financial security. However, finding a career path that fits both your interests and strengths is often challenging and this can be particularly true for…

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Building Better Relationships By Ms. Sonya Blandford, Psychologist

Both choice theory and reality therapy were created by Dr William Glasser, a Psychologist.  A chief tenet of choice theory is that, while people are ultimately in control of, and can thus choose, almost all of their thoughts and behaviours, they do not have control over other people' thoughts or behaviours.   Glasser believes that you do not have control over…

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